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We are now accepting orders
Although many items are out of stock currently, we are working around the clock to get all your favorite Apple Barrel, Bucilla, Delta, FolkArt, and Mod Podge items back in stock as soon as we can! 

Our goal is to ship orders as quickly as possible; however, we are experiencing some delays in processing and shipping orders at this time. All orders will be shipped ground by FedEx SmartPost only, and a tracking number will be provided when your order ships.

We appreciate your understanding and continued support of Plaid products. If you have any questions, please contact us.

FAQs

Do I need to mix or shake FolkArt Marbling Medium before using it?

No, do not shake FolkArt Marbling Medium before using, as doing so may introduce air bubbles into the product.

How long does it take FolkArt Marbling Paint to cure?
FolkArt Marbling Paint cures to a surface approximately 48 hours after it has dried.
How long does it take FolkArt Marbling Paint to dry?

FolkArt Marbling dries to the touch within one hour and will be completely dry within 24 hours; however, variables such as the type of surface being marbled, the thickness of paint application and the humidity of the work area will all affect the individual drying time of each marbled project.

Is it necessary to seal or varnish FolkArt Marbling Paint?

Projects created using FolkArt Marbling Paints MUST be sealed. Project surfaces can be spray sealed using FolkArt Acrylic Lacquers (Matte, Satin, or Gloss Finishes) or brushed with FolkArt Artists’ Varnish (Satin or Gloss).

Note: Before storing finished marbled projects, surfaces should be sealed to keep projects from sticking to one another.

On what types of surfaces can I use FolkArt Marbling Paint?

Many surfaces can be decorated with FolkArt Marbling Paint: wood, papier mache, paper, canvas, metal, glassware, glazed ceramics, hard plastic, terracotta and fabric.

If attempting to marbleize a sealed surface such as glassware, glazed ceramics, or hard plastic, the surface should be kept for decorative use only, as surfaces painted with FolkArt Marbling Paint are not washable. The same goes for marbleizing fabric surfaces; FolkArt Marbling Paint is not washable on a fabric surface.

Where can I learn more about FolkArt Marbling Paint?
You can learn more about this product by reading the FolkArt Marbling Paint FAQ document. 
Can FolkArt Pouring Medium be used with FolkArt Pouring Paints?
No, direct mixing of FolkArt Pouring Medium with FolkArt Pouring Paint is not necessary as FolkArt Pouring Paints are already premixed with the necessary amount of Pouring Medium and no mixing is required. NOTE: FolkArt Pouring Paint (paint that does not need to be mixed with Pouring Medium) can, however, be used as one of the desired colors  when creating a fluid art project along with FolkArt Acrylic Paints (that do need to be mixed with Pouring Medium.)
Can FolkArt Pre-Mixed Pouring Paint be used with other paint products?
No, direct mixing of FolkArt Pre-Mixed Pouring Paint with other paint products will compromise the color, the finish as well as the ability to achieve the desired marbled effect. 
 
Can I mix two FolkArt Pre-Mixed Pouring Paints to achieve a new color or different value of the same color?
Yes, FolkArt Pre-Mixed Pouring Paints can be intermixed with one another to create a new color or different value of the same color.  To mix small amounts of color at a time, simply squeeze a small amount of paint to be mixed into a cup.  Using a spoon, stir stick, Popsicle stick, skewer or palette knife, blend a small amount of darker color into the lighter color.  Continue adding small amounts of the dark color until the desired value is achieved.  
 
Can I use water to thin FolkArt Pouring Medium?
Thinning FolkArt Pouring Medium is not necessary, as it is manufactured to the perfect consistency to create a variety of marbled effects using either the Direct Pour Method, the Dirty Pour Method, or the Flip Cup Method.
 
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