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Bucilla Stitchery

General Stitchery FAQ

Separate the strands of floss
Take one strand and double it (most cross stitches require 2 strands, while back stitches require just one.)
Thread the looped end of the strand through the eye of the needle
Pull the loop to the bottom
NEVER make knots in your floss, so as to ensure a smooth finished back.
Tape the edges of your fabric to get a more secure mount when using stretcher bars. This will also help prevent your fabric from slipping.
Experiment with the tension on your thread or yarn. You may be pulling your stitches too tight.
Experiment with the tension on your thread or yarn. You are probably stitching too loose.
These fun stitches are decorative loops.
Bring needle up at A. Make a loose loop with the thread and insert needle back in A and bring point of needle up at B (just inside loop). Pull needle out at B and insert back in at B, over the loop.
Cross-stitches on evenweave are worked over two fabric threads, so the finished “x” covers a four-thread square.
Stitching is done by coming up through a hole between woven threads at A. Then go down at B, the hole diagonally across from A. Come back up at C and down at D, etc. Complete the top stitches to create an “X.” All top stitches should lie in the same direction.
Cross-stitches are completed in a row or if necessary, can be done one at a time in an area.
Stitching is done by coming up through a hole between woven threads at A. Then go down at B, the hole diagonally across from A. Come back up at C and down at D, etc. Complete the top stitches to create an “X.” All top stitches should lie in the same direction.
Straight stitches are stitched the same as the length of the line segment on the Design Chart.
Come up at A; go down at B. Pull flat. Repeat A – B for each stitch. Straight stitches can be worked in a vertical, horizontal, or diagonal direction.
These are decorative knots completed after all other stitching is finished.
Come up at A; loosely wrap floss once around needle. Place needle at B, next to A. Pull floss taut as you push needle down through fabric. Carry floss across back of work between knots.
These fun stitches are decorative loops held in place with a tack stitch at the end of the loop.
Bring needle up at A. Make a loose loop with the thread and insert needle back in A and bring point of needle up at B (just inside loop). Pull needle out at B and insert back in at B, over the loop.
Cross-stitches are done in a row or if necessary, can be done one at a time in an area.
Stitching is done by coming up at A, then go down at B, the hole diagonally across from A. Come back up at C and down at D, etc. Complete the top stitches to create an “X.” All top stitches should lie in the same direction.
These are decorative knots completed after all other stitching is finished.
Come up at A; loosely wrap floss once around needle. Place needle at B, next to A. Pull floss taut as you push needle down through fabric. Carry floss across back of work between knots.
Back stitches are completed after cross-stitches and each stitch is made the same length as one cross-stitch.
Pull the needle through at the point marked A. Then go down at the point marked B. Come back up at C and down at D.
The chain stitch is great for flower stems or outlining.
Come up at A; hold loop on surface of fabric. Go down in same hole at A. Come up at B, inside loop. Pull loop even around B. Repeat A-B, going down inside completed loop. Go down at C over last loop to secure.
Lay Straight Stitch base.
Come up at A; go down at B. Couch: Come up at C, go down at D. Continue to secure base at even intervals.
This stitch is also known as the Interlocked Satin Stitch?
Place first row of stitches. Come up at A. Go down at B. Come up at C, between previous row of stitches, as shown. Work alternating rows of long and short stitches. Repeat A-B-C sequence for each row to fill in area.
This stitch is similar to the straight stitch.
Come up at A. Go down at B. Pull flat. Split the end of the stitch with the needle and come up at C. Go down at D. Repeat C-D.
The running stitch is good for outlining.
Come up at A; go down at B. Come up at C, go down at D. Refer to Design Chart for length of stitches and amount of space between stitches.
Satin stitches should be close enough to cover fabric without overlapping.
Refer to the Design Chart for size of area to be worked in satin stitches. Begin at one side of satin stitched area. Come up at A; go down at B. Fill in area.
Straight stitches are stitched the same as the length of the line segment on the Design Chart.
Come up at A; go down at B. Pull flat. Repeat A – B for each stitch. Straight stitches can be worked in a vertical, horizontal, or diagonal direction.
The half cross stitch is simply the first part of a cross stitch without cross back over to form the “X”.
Come up at A, go down at B. Pull flat. Come up at C and down at D, etc. Work each stitch in the direction shown on Design Chart.
Satin stitches should be close enough to cover fabric without overlapping. Refer to the Design Chart for size of area to be worked in satin stitches.
Begin at one side of satin stitched area. Come up at A; go down at B. Fill in area.
These kinds of stitches are simply portions of a cross stitch.
A quarter cross-stitch is one of the extensions from the center of a cross-stitch. These stitches can be worked from any corner in toward the center as shown in examples 1 - 5. A three quarter cross-stitch is a combination of a quarter stitch and half cross-stitch.
The back stitch is the same process in regular embroidery and in cross stitch. Back stitches are completed after cross-stitches and are used to outline the design area or embellish areas of a design. In cross stitch, the back stitch is made the same length as the cross stitch.
Process: Pull the needle through at the point marked A. Then go down at the point marked B. Come back up at C and down at D.
The running stitch is often used to created backgrounds and texture in cross stitch designs.
Come up at A; go down at B. Come up at C, go down at D. Refer to Design Chart for length of stitches and amount of space between stitches.
Counted cross-stitch is a needlecraft usually done on an evenweave fabric like Aida cloth or linen. To create the design, you follow a chart by creating a cross-stitch (x) of floss that corresponds to the appropriate color symbol on the design chart. Most cross-stitch is 14 (stitches) to the inch, worked up with two strands of embroidery floss. Embroidery floss is 6 strands and you separate them to get 3 lots of 2 strands from one length of embroidery floss.
Crewel is usually worked on linen that is stamped with the outline of the design. You follow the chart to fill in the areas. The design is worked up with wool yarn on a satin stitch.
Needlepoint is usually worked on canvas that is printed with the design. You fill in the design areas with yarn. Needlepoint is “full coverage” which means that no canvas is exposed when the design is complete. The design is usually worked up with wool yarn in a continental stitch.
Nothing- they are the same stitch, but people sometimes call them by different names.
Nothing, they are the same stitch used for different purposes. The buttonhole stitch IS the blanket stitch worked as closely together as possible on either side of the slit made in fabric where the button hole will be.
The blanket stitch usually has space between each stitch and is used as a decorative stitch for attaching quilting appliqués.
Using a hoop makes it much easier to complete the stitching. When the fabric is stretched taut, it makes the hole as big as possible, which allows the needle to slip easily in and out of the holes. Hoops also allow for better control and more uniform stitch work.

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